The Swedish IT-wonder is alive:
Xerox honors Swedish inventor of minimalistic operating system with maximal field of application


Chester Carlson Stockholm, jan 07, 2008 : This year Chester Carlson award goes to the Swedish programming genius Adam Dunkels, young researcher at SICS, Swedish Institute of Computer Science. He has developed a program that enables tiny, built-in computers to send and receive information wireless via Internet. Today Dunkels program is used by hundreds of companies. For example it can be found in NASA: s satellites and in exclusive BMW cars.

- I’m very surprised and it is a great honor considering the background and history of this award. It is also a statement for us using open source within research, says Adam Dunkels, (Ph D), experimental computer scientist and researcher at SICS.

A new, concrete application of Adam Dunkels technology is the “sensor buoy” that will be used for surveying the environment in the Baltic Sea. Consequently it is not needed to send out ships in order to perform measurements which will both spare the environment and save resources. Other appliances for his technology are different net based system within the health care industry, which is expected to become the next big industry with systems connected to Internet.

Through Adam Dunkels ideas and work the vision of intelligent machines and systems has become reality. Today only two out of ten processors is located in what we call ordinary computers. The rest is placed is all machines surrounding us. Adam receives the prize “for the development of operating system and communication program that enables cost effective Internet connection of new product categories”.

Adam Dunkels program is spread actively with open source – available for everyone for free. The software developed by Adam Dunkels is suitable for all built-in systems and applications. For example it is used in car motors, satellite systems and film and television equipment. Most recently it was when shooting The Lord of the Rings Movies. It is also used by companies like Volvo, ABB, Cisco and Ericsson use his program. The prestigious research award in memory of Chester Carlson was distributed at Swedish Institute of Computer Science (SICS) conference UTSIKT 2008. This year it is 70 years since the Swedish American Chester Carlson made the first Xerox copy in the world on October 22nd 1938.

Two years ago the researcher Jonas Beskow was rewarded the prize for SynFace, an invention that transforms speech into face and lip movements reproduced in real time via a computer animated face. The invention makes it easier for people with reduced hearing to use the telephone. Today SynFace is successfully commercialized in the company SynFace AB that sells the world leading and award winning solution.

About the Chester Carlson Award
The Chester Carlson Fund awards persons or institutions for significant research or development within the area of information science. The price is administrated by the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Science, IVA, and the price is awarded by the Chester Carlson Fund with representatives from Xerox and IVA. The Swedish descendant Chester Carlson patented the first process for the dry copying, "xerographic method," which is the foundation of all modern photocopiers and laser printers. He also was a founder of Xerox Corporation.

About Xerox Europe
Xerox Europe, the European operations of Xerox Corporation, markets a comprehensive range of Xerox products, solutions and services, as well as associated supplies and software. Its offerings are focused on three main areas: offices from small to large, production print and graphic arts environments, and services that include consulting, systems design and management, and document outsourcing.

Xerox Europe also has manufacturing and logistics operations in Ireland, the UK and the Netherlands, and a research and development facility (Xerox Research Centre Europe) in Grenoble, France. For more information visit, www.xerox.com

For more information on Chester Carlson Award , please contact:
Sofia Nilsson, Xerox Sverige AB, Tel 08-795 10 56 sofia.nilsson@xerox.com

Birgitta Björkskär, Kungl. Ingenjörsvetenskapsakademien, Tel 08-791 30 41 bb@iva.se

For images:
Helena Sandström, TurbolinPR, Tel 08-660 25 25 helena@turbolinpr.se